August 2018

Helping families with addiction; CRAFT; TSA Precheck and humility Savvy Anyone who has treated a person suffering from addiction knows how much family members and significant others are also affected by addiction. Those closest to a person with addiction are often at their wits end to know: What to do to “make” their loved one stop using or behaving addictively How to cope with their own anger, frustration, fears and despair Where to turn to get help, especially when their addicted loved one doesn’t seem to even care to get help. They may have heard about “tough love” and getting the person to “hit bottom” before treatment and recovery can begin. Reality TV shows about Intervention and “rehab” give some glimpse of what next steps might be, but they also suspect that is all “reality TV”. TIP 1 Empathy training for families is more effective to engage people with addiction than tough love and hitting bottom It is easy to adopt the widespread view that you have to “break through denial”; confront the addicted person; set a limit and if necessary “kick them out” until they “hit bottom”. But in a program earlier this month on National Public Radio’s “Here …

July 2018

How many seconds do you wait? – Improving medication adherence – How’s the water?

May 2018 – What to Say When…. What would you say if…?

Vol. 16, No. 2 In this issue: Welcome to the May edition of Tips and Topics (TNT). To the many new subscribers joining us this month, thanks for choosing to be part of the TNT community. David Mee-Lee, M.D. DML Training and Consulting In the many hundreds of workshops, plenary and breakout sessions I have presented, there is one training objective I hold important: Will participants leave with something they can use in their daily work? I know I am successful in that goal most of the time. Over the years, many have told me how something they learned changed their whole perspective, practice or policy. In particular, workshop attendees find it useful when they hear an example of how to convert a clinical principle or policy and procedure into actual words to say to a client. So in this combined SAVVY and SKILLS section, here are some “scripts” of what to say in different situations. This is how I might say it. But you should fashion what you say in ways that make sense to you and most importantly, that make sense to your clients, patients or participants. Job No. 1 in the first minutes of meeting a client …

Vol. #15 No. 10 – January 2018

Welcome to 2018 and the January edition of Tips & Topics (TNT). I hope you, like me, are looking forward to a happy, healthy and productive year. SAVVY In late November/early December, I made a quick trip to India to do a three day training train on The ASAM (American Society of Addiction Medicine) Criteria. I was in Pune, about 95 miles from Mumbai (formerly known or as Bombay). In November’s SOUL section I spoke about the bureaucracy of getting a visa to train in India.   Tips & Topics November 2017 Since this was India’s first introduction to The ASAM Criteria, I wanted to share a brief Q&A with Ranjana Pavamani, the driving force behind bringing this training into reality: 1. Who you are and why do you have such a passion for bringing The ASAM Criteria to India? I am Ranjana Pavamani, Executive Director of IC&RC IADCC (International Certification and Reciprocity Consortium (IC&RC) and International Alcohol and Drug Counselor Certification Trust for India). I come from a pioneering background where my father, the late Dr. Vijayan Pavamani, pioneered Drug Rehabilitation and Suicide Prevention for South East Asia In 1971 under The Calcutta Samaritans. Over time, I felt this intense desire to …